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Read it Before You See it!

2011 is going to be a great year for kids movies... because it seems like they're all based on books! So while the Potter-files count down the clock until Harry and Voldemort's final duel, and Twihards breathlessly await Bella and Edward's wedding, here are some other books that have been adapted to to sate your literary viewing needs.

 

Get Graphic

There are way too many cool graphic novels out there for teens today. Listed below are only a couple.

The Runaways by Brian K Vaughan (books 1-7): Set in the Marvel Universe, this series is about a group of kids who find out their parents are super villains. What ensues qualifies as a teen/comedy/romance/adventure story that fans of Maximum Ride will devour. Keep an eye out for cameos by Captain America, Wolverine and even a vampire. For ages 12+

Scott Pilgrim Series (6 books) by Bryan Lee O'Malley:

Congratulations Erin Stead!

Erin Stead now joins the ranks of illustrators such as Robert McClosky and Maurice Sendak as the 2011 Caldecott Medal Winner*! (Pause for Applause) Written by Philip Stead, A Sick Day for Amos McGee is a tender story of reciprosity and friendship. When kindly zookeeper Amos has to call out sick from work, his animal friends come to him! Erin's gorgeous illustrations make this already charming story pop. Through use of limited palette and meticulously rendered pencil drawings, the visual world of Amos McGee is at once gentle and arresting.

Anna & The French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

Pre-holiday madness is in full swing at the bookstore, so there isn't much time for blogging book recs - but we HAD to tell you about one of our new faves. ANNA AND THE FRENCH KISS is brand new and it rocks. For those who like funny and romantic contemporary novels, this is a perfect choice. When Anna is shipped off to boarding school in Paris, she doesn't know a parlez-vous from a coochie-coo, and she doesn't much care - all she knows is, she is missing the guy that she likes and all her friends at home. But then she meets the Etienne St. Clair... who is very hot, but also very taken. Let the giddiness begin! This is a frothy, addictive and fun novel chock full of amazing voice - we adore it and hope you do too! :D

Countdown by Deborah Wiles

People are talking so much about the innovative (illustration-heavy)  format of COUNTDOWN, as well as the historical setting ( the Cuban Missile Crisis) they're neglecting to mention that it's simply a wonderfully written book. Franny's voice is fresh and convincing, offering insights to both the tumult of the era, but also the usual emotional swings of a kid turning into a teenager.  In turns breathless and immediate, but also mindful and poetic (Franny is herself a reflective kid) Wiles earns the buzz she's getting.

Kneebone Boy by Ellen Potter

The only thing KNEEBONE BOY has in common with Ellen Potter's other books is that it is excellent.  Told by one (you don't know which) of three odd semi-orphans, the book follows the trio on a search for their missing mother, in a house strange enough to be magical. Only it isn't. The characters are at once bizarre, and human, and the end is an absolute surprise. Amazing!
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