Books Inc. Kids Blog

Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler

Told in a series of letters (really one long letter divided into chapters), and objects, in a box to Ed. Min tells the story of her first real love and heartbreak. There are many firsts woven throughout- including the ultimate “first time.” As Min and Ed grow closer, the differences between them start to tear them apart. Overall an enjoyable novel with a unique style of storytelling! This is something I can appreciate as a writer. Ages 15 and up. --Reviewed by Renee from Books Inc. Market Street

Clockwork Scarab by Colleen Gleason

In alternate steampunk Victorian England, Irene Adler hires the niece of Sherlock Holmes and the half-sister of Bram Stoker to solve a mystery surrounding the recent suicides of London’s eligible society girls. This all probably sounds awesome, largely because it is. The content is handled so fluidly and Gleason offers a fresh voice to young fans of mystery and detective stories. Miss Holmes and Miss Stoker, respectively an insufferable know-it-all and a dark action girl with a suicidal streak, balance each other perfectly. This is another example of really good world building and writing, but the heroines and their relationship shines. --Reviewed by Marie at Books Inc. Chestnut Street

Meet Your Favorite Authors!

 

 

Here at Books Inc. kids we're super proud to have the opportunity to host a wide variety of awesome, talented and beloved children's authors for public events. Be sure to sign up for our monthly newsletter, to stay on top of all the excellence!

(Photo posted with parents' permission at our October 2013 Jeff Kinney Event!)

True Blue Scouts of Sugar Man Swamp by Kathi Appelt

Set in the bayous of East Texas, this tells of the struggle to save an tiny unspoiled gem of wilderness and rural living fro two separate threats. In one plotline a boy named Chap helps his mom run a pie shop beloved by the locals for the exquisite pies made from sugarcane of the swamp surrounding them. He mourns his grandfather who imparted Chap all manner of lore. Now their way of life is threatened by one of those greedy cartoonish developers who often show up in this sort of story.

Unbeknownst to the humans, a pair of young raccoons are concerened by another attack on the swamp, in the form of a family of terrifing feral pigs crashing towards the famous sugarcane. these plucky little critters, Bingo and J'miah are the Information Scouts of the swamp. Their clever kin have served the swamp for untold generations watching for danger. When a crisis like this arises they must wake the Sugar Man, the legendary protector of the bayou-- part Bigfoot and part Paul Bunyan.


The folksy venacular will turn some readers away, it is laid on thick. Comparisons to Carl Hiaasen are inevitable. I fould that the denizens of Sugar Man Swamp also his the same sweet spots as Pogo and Margery Sharp's The Rescuers. There's a bluesy, rockin' rhythm and loads of humor, heart, and courage. Readers will be reminded that an ecosystem does include people as well as animals; that our history and family stories join with the turns of the seasons and the calls of unseen birds. --Reviewed by Chris of Compass Books, SFO Terminal 3

Syndicate content