WELCOME!

Not Your Mother's Book Club Blog

Books Inc., the West’s oldest independent bookstore, started Not Your Mother’s Book Club with one big idea: to bring the best writers in the world to the best readers in the world. And we're not REALLY a club. That's just our name, and really, what's in a name? We're actually just an inclusive bunch of PASSIONATE readers who get to hang out with the coolest authors on the scene!
We throw parties, eat snacks and read, read, read, read, read...
 We also have a lot of fun ... and we invite you to join us.  
Yay books!

NYMBC's blog

Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgewick-

A stranger comes to a remote island to try and discover the truth about a mysterious flower that may be keeping the world's rich young. Instead, he finds himself regressing through the history of the island; stories and people somehow cropping up time and time again. With shades of Patrick McGoohan's The Prisoner, to Oscar Wilde's more melancholy fairy stories, to Nordic sagas, this book is beautifully sparce. A great quick read! Ages 14+
--reviewed by Steven of Books Inc. Palo Alto

Please Ignore Vera Dietz by A.S. King

Vera Dietz lost her best friend Charlie-- so why is he appearing to her at all the wrong times? What ensues is a beautiful tale of loss and redemption. While there are touches of romance, and plenty of school drama to go around, the real gem of this narrative was held for me in the burgeoning relationship between Vera and her emotionally distant, yet caring father.

I loved ASK THE PASSENGERS by King, and so I had to read more of her work. And I'm so glad I did. King has nailed the magical realism genre in way that is so authentically teen that it hurts my mind. In a good way. Told with King's signature sense of humor, depth, intelligence and honesty, this novel has affirmed my goal of reading EVERY BOOK A.S. King has ever written. And I hope you do, too. (ages 13+)

--Reviewed by Maggie, Books Inc. Children's Department Director

Uses for Boys by Erica Lorraine Scheidt

Anna grew up with the story that when she came along, her mom wasn't alone anyone. She was her mom's world, her "five-pointed star", but that wasn't enough for her mom. She wasn't enough. Her mom starts dating and along come a string of boyfriends and husbands that flutter in and out of Anna's life. Soon, it's just her alone in the empty house. To fill the loneliness, Anna turns to boys thinking that if she gives boys what they want, they can give her what she needs. Companionship. Company. Affection. This 240 page book is not light, contrary to looks. Sexuality, rape, abortion are some of the issues that show up in the story. However, this book never dissolves into an "issues" book - not once while I was reading the book felt like I was being bashed over the head with a point. Rather, the entire focus of the story is Anna. It's her story. And Anna....I felt for her so much. I just wanted to spirited her away or at least give her a million hugs of affection. The things that she endured and the lack of positive, loving adult presence in her life breaks my heart. But the thing that drives home Anna's story is Scheidt's prose. It's frank, sparse and lyrical. She doesn't hold back in her words, but she's not overly descriptive either. The words are just so. Raw. honest and wonderfully written. --reviewed by Connie of Books Inc. Opera Plaza

Splintered by AG Howard

This is a very gritty, dark, re-imagining of Alice in Wonderland. 17-year-old Alysa is the great great great granddaughter of Alice Liddell—yes the Alice. Ever since Alice told her story to Lewis Carroll, all of the women in Alyssa's family have been cursed with madness. In order to protect herself and save her own mother (who has been in an institution since Alyssa was 5) Alyssa goes down the rabbit hole. Once there, she is faced with the choice between Jeb who has known her since childhood, and the mysterious Morpheus who seems to have known her since before she was born...Reality and fantasyboth have a claim to her but which will Alyssa choose?

This book really resonated with me because the idea of a beautiful world you can escape into would have meant the world to me when I was a teenager. Actually, it still does! And normally love triangles bother me, but these two men literally represented two different parts of her. And what teenager doesn't feel like two people in one? This book inspired me not only to reread both the Alice books (twice), but also to change my Halloween costume and force my partner and my best friends to dress as characters from the books too. --Reviewed by Katherine, of Books Inc. Laurel Village

Syndicate content